Film: Fire In The Blood

Film: Fire In The Blood

IPS’ Global Economy and Foreign Policy In Focus projects co-sponsor this a shocking exposé of how pharmaceutical companies use patent law to keep profits unconscionably high even at the expense of peoples’ lives.

Food security and the WTO

Food security and the WTO

The WTO should stop insisting on an out-of-date trade agenda. It should get back on track — or get out of the way — to support fresh approaches that bolster local food systems.

Book Event: Kim Fellner’s ‘Wrestling With Starbucks’

Book Event: Kim Fellner’s ‘Wrestling With Starbucks’

Please join us at a book discussion with Kim Fellner, the former director of the National Organizers Alliance. Fellner recently published Wrestling With Starbucks: Conscience, Capital, Cappuccino, a feisty and unpredictable book that traces how the Battle of Seattle – informed by the Internet – helped consolidate a new global justice culture that didn’t buy anything about Starbucks (except, maybe, the coffee). It explains what Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz, Service Employees International Union President Andy Stern, and Global Exchange Co-director Medea Benjamin hold in common – and what they don’t. It tells the largely unknown story of how Starbucks rescued thousands of Central American coffee growers from going under – and became a major patron of biodiversity. It explores two competing definitions of goodness – being better than the rest vs. being good in a larger moral context – the place where the rub of capitalism hits the road of global economic equity.

A Third Way: Globalization from the Bottom

A Third Way: Globalization from the Bottom

According to Mark Engler, the future of globalization is in question. Will the fight between “imperial globalization” and “corporate globalization” lead to the rise of democratic globalization”?

Derail Doha, Save the Climate

From the point of view of environmental sustainability, global trade has become deeply dysfunctional.

The WTO’s Raw Deal on Services

Think trade liberalization in agriculture and industry is bad? What the United States and EU want to do with financial services is a train wreck about to happen.

Destroying African Agriculture

Destroying African Agriculture

The World Bank and the IMF are the real culprits behind the current food crisis, argues columnist Walden Bello.

Book Event: Mark Engler’s "How to Rule the World"

Mark Engler will sign and discuss his new book, How to Rule the World: The Coming Battle Over the Global Economy. (Nation Books, Release Date: April 7, 2008, ISBN 978-1568583655). Thea Lee, policy director for the AFL-CIO, will moderate the discussion.

"As the world readies to heave a collective sigh of relief upon George W. Bush’s exit from the White House, How to Rule the World is a caution against complacency. Mark Engler offers a timely reminder that before Bush’s boots and bombs there was Clinton’s corporate ‘consensus’–more soothing perhaps but no more sustainable than the neocons’ disastrous militarism. He then makes a case that there lies a third choice: democracy. Impressively researched and sharply argued, How to Rule the World is an essential handbook not for the few who do rule the world but for the many who should." -GREG GRANDIN, author of Empire’s Workshop

Right now a debate is taking place over what values should define our international order. For global elites, it is a debate about how to rule the world. Laying out a new and original framework for understanding globalization politics, Mark Engler describes the conflict between a Clinton-era vision of an expanding, corporate-controlled global economy and a Bush-era "imperial globalization" based on U.S. military dominance. How to Rule the World explains how these visions overlap and also how, at critical moments, they clash with one another. It is written, however, in the hopes that neither will prevail. Even as Wall Street CEOs and Washington militarists argue among themselves, citizens’ uprisings in the United States, in an increasingly progressive Latin America, and beyond are bringing to life a vibrant "democratic globalization" based on economic justice, human rights, and self-determination.

Engler, a journalist, activist, and policy expert, details how the Bush administration has reshaped globalization in ways that few protesters in Seattle or elsewhere could have foreseen: Global trade talks are collapsing. The roles of international institutions like the WTO, IMF, and World Bank are dramatically changing. U.S. unilateralism and the disastrous war in Iraq have deepened international divisions. As a result, the stage is now set for a critical new debate about the global economy.

"Fasten your seatbelt. You’re in for a ride that will change your understanding of where we’ve been, what’s really going on now, and what’s coming next. Mark Engler explores, for the first time, the emerging battle between ‘corporate globalization’ and ‘imperial globalization’- and the alternative, ‘democratic globalization, or globalization from below.’ If you want to know ‘what ever happened to the anti-globalization movement,’ why it is likely to roar back as a powerful force in world politics, and why it may make another world possible, don’t miss this unique and indispensable guide." -JEREMY BRECHER, author of Strike!, Global Village or Global Pillage, and Globalization from Below

"Full of passion, hope, and insight, How to Rule the World assures us that the future of globalization is not a foregone conclusion. Rejecting both the imperial behemoth and the leviathan of corporate rule, Mark Engler weaves disparate movements and burgeoning efforts in far flung corners of the globe together to show the strong, tensile strands of a democratic alternative–a globalization from below that has the power to shape the post-Bush era." -FRIDA BERRIGAN, New America Foundation, Arms and Security Initiative

"This is one of the most hopeful and challenging progressive books to be written in a long time. Global elites, it turns out, are no more cohesive than, say, the crime families of New York, and perhaps a good deal less so. As the fault lines among those who have ruled the world for the past few decades become ever more clear, the time is upon us to finally follow up on Seattle and to bring democracy home. Never was a book more timely." -Andy Bichlbaum, THE YES MEN

Mark Engler is a writer based in New York City and an analyst with Foreign Policy In Focus. His articles appear in Dissent, The Nation, Newsday, the Progressive, the San Francisco Chronicle, Mother Jones, and In These Times. An archive of his work is available at www.DemocracyUprising.com.

An activist originally from Des Moines, Iowa, Mark is a member of the National Writers Union (UAW, Local 1881). He has previously worked with the Arias Foundation for Peace and Human Progress in San José, Costa Rica, and he has also lived in Guatemala and El Salvador.