Mending Our Welcome Mat

Mending Our Welcome Mat

At the Canadian border, there were no wire fences or soldiers with guns. The biggest decision Rose’s family had to make was whether or not to identify themselves as Jewish when they registered with American immigration services. It was a huge, potentially...
Celebrating Destruction

Celebrating Destruction

Everyone on the Mall near the Washington Monument was looking up at the sky. I was there, too. But I wasn’t looking up, at least not that far up. On May 8, I was playing Ultimate Frisbee during the noontime game on a stretch of level grass behind the Holocaust Museum....

Emphasis Added: The Foreign Policy Week in Pieces (4/12)

Mental Illness a Prerequisite to Run for Public Office It’s unbelievable what people would do to be in power. I know: It happens everywhere. I can’t believe that normal people in their right mind would run for elected position. There has to be something...
How West Africa Helped Win World War II

How West Africa Helped Win World War II

In June 1940, when France fell to the German invasion, Italy seized the moment to attack British positions in Egypt, Kenya, and Sudan. By the end of March 1941, German Major-General Erwin Rommel’s mechanized troops had driven the British out of Libya and back...
Pumping Gas Prices for All They’re Worth

Pumping Gas Prices for All They’re Worth

Oh my God. Gasoline is headed for five bucks a gallon. I read it in the newspaper, so I know it’s true. The national average is already creeping up on $4, and it’s bound to climb higher as the summer surge in travel approaches. FIVE DOLLARS A GALLON! Oh...
A Zero on the Home Front’s Richter Scale

A Zero on the Home Front’s Richter Scale

Among the strange things that happened last year — and there were many — perhaps the strangest was the end of the Iraq War. Did you notice it? I wouldn’t blame you if you didn’t. It hardly even registered on the home front’s Richter...

Okinawan Delegation Visits DC for Base Closure

A delegation of politicians, lawyers, activists and students from Okinawa, Japan, will travel to Washington, DC, from January 21 to January 27 to advocate for the closure of Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Futenma. The delegation of 24 Japanese leaders will hold a...
UN Origins Project Part 7: Forging a Lasting Peace

UN Origins Project Part 7: Forging a Lasting Peace

World War II ushered in the age of globalization. While the proliferation of information-technology has increased the speed of globalization to breakneck pace in the last two decades, the foundations of the tightly interconnected world we live in now were laid in the...
UN Origins Project Series, Part 6: The Things We Fight For

UN Origins Project Series, Part 6: The Things We Fight For

In the early days of World War II, President Franklin D. Roosevelt gave his famous Four Freedoms Speech, in which he articulated those fundamental freedoms that should be realized by people the world over. The first two freedoms, freedom of speech and expression and...
UN Origins Project Series, Part 5: Sharpening the Teeth of Peace

UN Origins Project Series, Part 5: Sharpening the Teeth of Peace

“We must make clear to the Germans that the wrong for which their fallen leaders are on trial is not that they lost the war, but that they started it.” — Robert H. Jackson The following passage was taken from the document: War and Peace Aims:...

Mass Killing: a Higher Calling?

In Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin (Basic Books, 2010) Timothy Snyder writes of the years 1933 and 1945, during which the “bloodlands” — Poland, the Ukraine, Belarus, and the Balkan states — were alternately occupied by Russia and...

Treatment of Russian POWs in WWII Paved the Way for Holocaust

I just finished reading Timothy Snyder’s instant classic Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin (Basic Books, 2010) in which he chronicles the suffering of countries that were alternately occupied by Russia and Germany: Poland, the Ukraine, Belarus, and...