Postcard From Singapore

It’s 2 a.m. on a Saturday night. I’m in a Singapore police station. No, this story doesn’t involve alcohol. Fortunately neither the death penalty nor caning is likely. The story begins earlier on September 16, when I arrived in Singapore, the site of...

World Bank Shuts Out Dissident Voices

To the bankers and government officials who descended on the city state for the World Bank and International Monetary Fund annual meetings in September, Singapore may have looked like the perfect model of a globalized consumer society. Tellingly, for the first time,...

Africa Falls Off the IMF Agenda (Again)

World leaders and celebrities declared 2005 to be the “year of Africa” with much fanfare. Beginning with the UK’s Commission on Africa report, and culminating in some supposed gains for the continent at the summit meeting of the Group of Eight (G8)...
The Crisis of Multilateralism

The Crisis of Multilateralism

Already buffeted by institutional crisis and policy conflicts, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank are heading into their fall meeting—scheduled to begin September 13 in Singapore—with yet one more problem. Desperate to win credibility...

Chad Proves Oil and Poverty Alleviation Don’t Mix

The African nation of Chad has forced the World Bank to back down in a dispute that illustrates the problems with lending to poor nations for oil and gas production. The dispute reached full boil in January when the World Bank decided, in a rare move for an...

Another False Start for Fighting Global Warming

In the aftermath of the third- and fourth-most devastating hurricanes in Atlantic basin history, people are beginning to talk about the connections between extreme weather events and global warming. But connecting the dots between flooded New Orleans, Beaumont and the...

The WTO’s Development Crumbs

Conflicts over agriculture once again stalled World Trade Organization negotiations, which took a few halting steps in Hong Kong in December. Rich-country promises to reduce poverty and underdevelopment at the event, which representatives from 149 countries attended,...

Wrong Turn from Rio

SEEN’s researchers conduct their most comprehensive review to date of the role of the World Bank in sabotaging every attempt over more than a decade by actors inside and outside the Bank to address its disproportionate impact on the global climate.

Tug of War

This report looks at the leading corporate beneficiaries of World Bank fossil fuel finance — Halliburton, Chevron, Shell, Total, Exxon, etc. — and makes clear the quid pro quo involved in these investments: We find that 82% of all World Bank oil projects...

The World Bank and Fossil Fuels: At the Crossroad

A one-year glimpse and update on previous research showing the World Bank Group’s projects related to fossil fuels from Sept. 1, 2002 to Sept. 15, 2003 is completed in this research.

The World Bank and Fossil Fuels: A Clear and Present Danger

In its own words, the World Bank Group’s position as a leading source of global fossil fuel financing poses a “clear and present danger” to its reputation and the global commons. This brief shows that over $24 billion of World Bank financing has...

Chad-Cameroon Pipeline

The World Bank’s proposed Chad-Cameroon pipeline project, the largest construction project in Sub-Saharan Africa, is scheduled to be presented to the World Bank’s board of directors on May 23, 2000. The State Department has documented numerous cases of...

The World Bank and the G-7: Changing the Earth’s Climate or Business

This report extensively documents the actual fossil fuel projects financed by the World Bank and their greenhouse gas emissions, starting in 1992 at the Rio Earth Summit, through 1997. It finds that the World Bank supported projects that will add carbon emissions to...