Refugee Crisis Deepens in Mexico

Mexican human rights activists have issued an emergency appeal to apply international humanitarian standards in providing relief to more than 150 refugees- including at least 77 children-who have been camped out in the mountains of southern Mexico for more than a...
Why Burma’s Ethnic Minorities Become Refugees to Thailand

Why Burma’s Ethnic Minorities Become Refugees to Thailand

(Pictured: Karen refugee camp in Mae Sot, Thailand.) Recently Foreign Policy in Focus excerpted a new book titled Nowhere to be Home: Narratives from Survivors of Burma’s Military Regime (McSweeney’s Voice of Witness series), edited by Maggie Lemere and...
Reforming Asylum Policy

Reforming Asylum Policy

On May 14, 2010, a U.S. immigration judge granted asylum to President Barack Obama’s Kenyan aunt in a second hearing. Zeituni Onyangohad applied for asylum in 2002, but the request was denied in 2004 and she was ordered to leave the country. She stayed on,...
African Refugees and Immigrants: Challenges, Changes, Champions

African Refugees and Immigrants: Challenges, Changes, Champions

When ECDC was established as a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization in 1983, our initial goal was to respond to the needs of a growing Ethiopian community in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. As we observe 27 years of service to the community in 2010, we celebrate...
Postcard From…Damascus

Postcard From…Damascus

At the UN compound in Douma, a neighborhood in northern Damascus, men, women, and children sit in crowded warehouse-lik e buildings. These refugees from Iraq wait for the UNHCR food rations tha t will keep them from starving. Despite its occasional pariah status,...
Postcard from…Eastleigh

Postcard from…Eastleigh

The streets of Eastleigh, a neighborhood of Nairobi known as “Little Mogadishu,” are full of deep potholes, dust, and exhaust fumes. Somali women, many covered from head to toe, are braving the traffic. The smell of traditional Somali spices competes with...
Postcard from…Nepal

Postcard from…Nepal

Photo of Chet Nath by Laura Elizabeth Pohl Chet Nath Timsina dips his shaving brush in a metal bowl of water and carefully shaves around the bruises on his face. Light from the open back door spills into the bamboo hut and onto his plastered right leg, which balances...

False Sense of Security in Iraq

The Pentagon ushered in the New Year with seemingly welcome news: Iraq’s security is improving. Attacks across the country fell 62% and, according to aid organization Iraqi Red Crescent, 20,000 Iraqi refugees returned home from Syria in December alone. The U.S....

Still No Peace

President George W. Bush has been using somewhat stronger language than he has uttered previously about the Israeli-Palestinian situation and has made some optimistic predictions of a peace agreement within a year. Nevertheless, there is little reason to hope that the...
The Iraqi Refugee Crisis

The Iraqi Refugee Crisis

With the violence in Iraq showing no sign of slowing down, civilians increasingly suffer. The UN estimates that 2.6 million Iraqis have fled violence in their country since 2003 and at least 40-50,000 more Iraqis are leaving their homes every month. Two million have...

Tampering With the Evidence

Last year in Hamdania, west of Baghdad, eight U.S. soldiers abducted an Iraqi man from his home, threw him in a ditch, and shot him. The soldiers placed an AK-47 and a shovel near his body. They wanted to make it seem as though he were an insurgent digging holes to...

Shaking Up Bhutan

In December 2006, King Jigme Singye of Bhutan made headlines by suddenly abdicating and handing the throne to his Oxford-educated son, Jigme Geshar. He has also pledged to grant some measure of democracy to his subjects by holding democratic elections in 2008. The...