Building Peace in the Middle East

Building Peace in the Middle East

Come hear two Middle East policy experts and authors, IPS’s Phyllis Bennis and SIPRI’s Dan Smith, discuss how to build peace and justice in the region that plays such a pivotal role in global politics.

Terrorists Who Struck Washington in 1976 Face More Murder Charges

Terrorists Who Struck Washington in 1976 Face More Murder Charges

After decades of persistence from key lawyers, Chile’s Supreme Court has asked the U.S. government to extradite three former Chilean secret police agents in connection with the murder of United Nations diplomat Carmelo Soria in Chile in July 1976. All three of these men were also involved in the Letelier-Moffitt assassination.

Three Felonies a Day

Three Felonies a Day

In the world’s most incarcerated country, some high-profile sex offenders walk free.

African Union 10 Years Later: Accomplishments and Challenges

African Union 10 Years Later: Accomplishments and Challenges

Please join us for this lively and critical discussion celebrating the 10th anniversary of the African Union. In our quest to assess its challenges, success stories and pitfalls days ahead of the AU Summit, we will analyze and review issues of African political sovereignty, Peer Review Mechanism, AU as a member of the G20, Diaspora / Region 6, Gender Issues, and Conflict Resolution.

Book Event: Mandate for Change

Three decades ago, The Heritage Foundation produced a primer on the Reagan Revolution entitled Mandate for Leadership, which offered an overarching philosophy against government and in favor of unregulated markets. Now, with President Barack Obama in office, we face a promising moment in history to present a different ideological perspective for our nation’s future.

Join Demos, The Nation, and the Institute for Policy Studies for a forum featuring prominent experts and scholars in the progressive community. The speakers will draw on essays from a new book, Mandate for Change: Policies and Leadership for 2009 and Beyond, a collaboration of over 70 authors and activists that offers a set of specific policy proposals for the new national administration on critical domestic and international issues. The ideas, policies, and resources presented in this volume set forth a fundamental, badly needed “mandate for change” to reinvigorate government and rethink the role of markets and civil society.

Speakers:

Chester Hartman is Director of Research at the Poverty & Race Research Action Council in Washington, DC and the founder and former Chair of the Planners Network, a national organization of progressive urban and rural planners and community organizers. Throughout his career as an urban planner and scholar, he has served on many boards, including the editorial boards of the Journal of Urban Affairs, Housing Policy Debate, Urban Affairs Quarterly, Housing Studies, and The Journal of Negro Education. He is also a former Board Member of the National Low Income Housing Coalition, and was the founder and former President of PRRAC, as well as a Fellow of the Institute for Policy Studies in Washington and the Transnational Institute in Amsterdam.

Katrina vanden Heuvel has been editor of The Nation since 1995 and publisher since 2005. She is the co-editor of Taking Back America–And Taking Down The Radical Right and most recently, editor of The Dictionary of Republicanisms. She has received awards for public service from numerous groups, including The Liberty Hill Foundation, The Correctional Association, The Association for American-Russian Women, and the New York Civil Liberties Union’s Callaway Prize for the Defense of the Right of Privacy. She is also the recipient of The American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee’s 2003 "Voices of Peace" Award. Vanden Heuvel is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and serves on the board of the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, the Institute for Policy Studies, the World Policy Institute, the Correctional Association of New York, and the Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute.

Miles Rapoport is the President of Demos, where he sets the agenda and oversees the management of the organization and its fundraising efforts. Prior to assuming the helm at Demos, he served for ten years in the Connecticut legislature, where he was a leading expert on electoral reform and served as Chair of the Committee on Elections. In 1994, he was elected as Secretary of the State of Connecticut, during which time he released two unique reports on the state of democracy in Connecticut. His articles have appeared in national magazines and newspapers, and he is the founder of Northeast Action, a leading political reform organization in New England. Rapoport came to Demos from a position as Executive Director of DemocracyWorks, a Hartford-based group that works on democracy reform.

To register for this event, contact Jinny Khanduja at 212-389-1399 or jkhanduja@demos.org or click here.

Film Screening:  The Judge and the General

Film Screening: The Judge and the General

This screening of "The Judge and the General" will be the Washington, DC, premiere of this important documentary exploring the personal transformation of Chilean judge Juan Guzmán, the 2005 recipient of the Letelier-Moffitt Human Rights Award.  For more than 30 years, IPS has hosted this awards program in the names of two colleagues, Orlando Letelier and Ronni Karpen Moffitt, who were assassinated by agents of Pinochet in 1976.

About the film: When in 1998 Chilean judge Juan Guzmán was assigned the first criminal cases against the country’s ex-dictator, General Augusto Pinochet, no one expected much. Guzmán had supported Pinochet’s 1973 coup — waged as an anti-Communist crusade — that left the democratically elected president, Salvador Allende, and thousands of others dead or "disappeared." The filmmakers trace the judge’s descent into what he calls "the abyss," where he uncovers the past — including his own role in the tragedy. "The Judge and the General" reveals one of the 20th century’s most notorious episodes and tells a cautionary tale about violating human rights in the name of "higher ideals."

About the filmmakers

Elizabeth Farnsworth, Producer/Director
Elizabeth Farnsworth was chief correspondent and principal substitute anchor on PBS’s The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer from 1995-2000. She then became a senior correspondent, reporting mostly from overseas. She now freelances for The NewsHour and makes documentaries.

Patricio Lanfranco, Producer/Director
Patricio Lanfranco, a Chilean citizen living in Santiago, has been a researcher and producer for two decades. As senior producer of the news department of Chilean National TV (TVN), he produced the live television coverage of the 1995 trial of Manuel Contreras, former chief of Pinochet’s secret police, for the 1976 Washington, D.C. murder of Orlando Letelier. Letelier worked at the Institute for Policy Studies at the time of his assassination. Because of the broadcast, Chileans were able for the first time to watch attorneys present evidence in an official setting of human rights crimes committed by the secret police.

For additional information on screenings in other cities and TV broadcasts, see:  www.westwindproductions.org/the-judge-and-the-general.html

Granny Peace Brigade’s AFRICOM Teach-In

Granny Peace Brigade’s AFRICOM Teach-In

The Granny Peace Brigade’s Teach-In examines the implications of the new U.S. military command infrastructure, AFRICOM; and the direct threat to Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream of peace, economic justice, and racial harmony AFRICOM poses on the 40th anniversary of his assassination.

AFRICOM would be the sixth Defense Department regional military command, and according to the Pentagon, would consolidate all U.S. functions (Agriculture, Commerce, Treasury, Peace Corps, and others) under its jurisdiction. The department expects to be "fully operational" in October 2008 but the only African nation willing to house the command’s continental headquarters is Liberia. Currently, AFRICOM is based in Stuttgart-Moehringen, Germany.

Vinie Burrows, actor, writer, and member of the New York Granny Peace Brigade will moderate the program.

Speakers:

Emira Woods, co-director of Foreign Policy in Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies
Horace Campbell, professor of African American Studies and Political Science at Syracuse University
Frida Berrigan, senior research associate at the Arms Trade Resource Center, World Policy Institute
Sonia Sanchez, poet, educator, and member of the Philadelphia Granny Peace Brigade

Admission is free. Donations are welcomed. Doors will open at 1:15 PM, and light refreshments will be available. For more information, call (212) 865-7875.

Founded in 2005 in opposition to the Iraq occupation, the Granny Peace Brigade stands for peace and condemns the use of military force to resolve conflicts. www.grannypeacebrigade.org.

Greening the Pews

Religious communities are beginning to address the connections between climate change and global justice.