The Cooties Effect

McCain and Palin tried to smear Obama through guilt by association. But this isn’t just a Republican tactic.

IPS Mandate for Change Election Series: Post-Racial Politics?

As we get closer and closer to what will be a historic election for many reasons — one reason especially stands out: race. Many questions have arisen about just how far racial-politics have come in the United States — but even more questions have come up about the future of race and politics in this country. If Obama wins, does that mean we have closed a chapter in U.S. history? If McCain wins, does that mean we are reading from the same old book? Join IPS in exploring these questions about the past and how far (or not far) we have come, but more importantly — about the next steps, no matter who wins.

Panelists:

Dedrick Muhammad, Senior Organizer and Research Associate, Inequality and the Common Good project, IPS
Joy Zarembka, Director, Break the Chain Campaign, IPS and author, The Pigment of Your Imagination
Professor Clarence Lusane, author/activist and professor, American University (by video)

Moderator: Saif Rahman, Movements Coordinator, the Institute for Policy Studies.

Please RSVP to Adwoa Masozi at adwoa@ips-dc.org.

This event is part of the Institute for Policy Studies series of provocative brown-bag luncheon discussions of the various issues in the platforms of the Democratic, Republican, Green, and Independent presidential candidates. IPS and Chester Hartman have a new book coming out at the culmination of this brown-bag series, Mandate for Change, which will put forth what we feel are the best and most creative policy solutions for these and other pressing local, national and international issues.

About the Panelists:
Joy M. Zarembka has been a staff member of the Institute for Policy Studies for eight years and has been the Director of the Break the Chain Campaign, an advocacy/direct service organization working to help end modern-day slavery and human trafficking and to provide better protections for abused, enslaved and exploited workers in the Washington, DC area. Joy is currently serving as the Acting Director of Operations at IPS. She has been quoted extensively in The Wall Street Journal, Newsweek, US News and World Report, and The Washington Post for her trafficking expertise. In 1997, she was awarded the Fox International Fellowship to study at Cambridge University in England. Joy was given the Women’s Information Network’s Young Women of Achievement Award. She has recently published a chapter in Barbara Ehrenreich’s book, Global Woman: Nannies, Maids and Sex Workers in the New Economy and her book, The Pigment of Your Imagination: Mixed Race in a Global Society, was released last year. Joy also currently serves as an expert witness in civil and criminal cases.

Dedrick Muhammad is the Senior Organizer and Research Associate for the IPS Program on Inequality and the Common Good. His special area of focus is the domestic racial wealth divide particularly between African-Americans and white Americans. He was a co-author of the State of The Dream 2004, 2005, and 2008 reports. He also co-authored with Chuck Collins a chapter in the Inequality Reader. Dedrick was the former National Field Director for Reverend Al Sharpton’s National Action Network. He also was the Coordinator for the Racial Wealth Divide Project of United For A Fair Economy. His op-eds can be found on www.inequality.org and he has been featured on Democracy Now, BET News, C-SPAN, NPR, and many other radio and television shows.

Dr. Clarence Lusane is an Associate Professor of Political Science and International Relations in the School of International Service at American University. He is also an author, activist, scholar, lecturer, and journalist. For more than 25 years, he has written about and been active in national and international anti-racism politics, globalization, U.S. foreign policy, human rights and social issues such as education, crime, and drugs. His most recent book is Colin Powell and Condoleezza Rice: Foreign Policy, Race, and the New American Century (2006).  He is a national columnist for the Black Voices syndicated news network, and his writings have appeared in The Black Scholar, Race and Class, The Washington Post, Miami Herald, Baltimore Sun, Oakland Tribune, Covert Action Information Bulletin, Z Magazine, Radical History Journal, and many other publications.

Moderator: Saif Rahman is the Institute for Policy Studies Movements Coordinator. He sits on the United for Peace & Justice Steering Committee and is a Coordinating Committee member of the National Youth and Student Peace Coalition.
 

 

IPS Mandate for Change Election Series: Trade and Globalization

This election season, please join the Institute for Policy Studies in our series of provocative brown-bag luncheon discussions of the various issues in the platforms of the Democratic, Republican, Green, and Independent presidential candidates. IPS and Chester Hartman have a new book coming out at the culmination of this brown-bag series, Mandate for Change, which will put forth what we feel are the best and most creative policy solutions for these and other pressing local, national and international issues.

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Political candidates who spoke out against “free trade” made great gains in the 2006 elections. During this year’s primary season, Democratic contenders put the issue back in the spotlight, with Senator Barack Obama and his opponents vowing to make significant changes in the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and other unpopular trade deals. But will trade and globalization be factors in the general election? Thus far, the Presidential debates have all but ignored the issue. And if Obama wins the Presidency, how far would he go to change our global economic policies to support workers, communities, and the environment? Could we expect a dramatic shift — or a repeat of the Clinton Era trade deals?

Thea Lee, Policy Director and Chief International Economist at the AFL-CIO
Sarah Anderson, Director, Global Economy Program, IPS
Andy Gussert, National Director, Citizens Trade Campaign

Moderator: John Cavanagh, Director, IPS

Please RSVP to Adwoa Masozi at adwoa@ips-dc.org.

About the panelists

 

Thea Lee is Policy Director and Chief International Economist at the AFL-CIO, where she oversees research and strategies on domestic and international economic policy. She is also on the Board of Directors of the Worker Rights Consortium, United for a Fair Economy, and the National Bureau of Economic Research.

Andy Gussert is the National Director of the Citizens Trade Campaign, a coalition of environmental, labor, consumer, family farm, religious, and other civil society groups founded in 1992. Previously, Gussert was State Federation President of AFT-Wisconsin, a labor union representing teachers, pharmacists, public employees and many other job classifications. In 2004-05, Gussert served as director of CTC’s Wisconsin Fair Trade Coalition.

Sarah Anderson is the Director of the Global Economy Project at the Institute for Policy Studies. She is a co-author of the books Field Guide to the Global Economy and Alternatives to Economic Globalization and a member of Jubilee USA’s Coordinating Committee. She also served on the staff of the International Financial Institutions Advisory Commission, a Congressionally appointed commission to evaluate the World Bank and IMF in 2000.

Moderator: John Cavanagh, IPS Director and co-author (with Robin Broad) of Development Redefined: How the Market Met its Match.

Other events in this series include:

TUESDAY, October 28, 12:30 – 2pm
The Election and Post-Racial Politics
Dedrick Muhammad, Senior Organizer & Research Associate, Inequality and the Common Good project, IPS
Joy Zarembka, Director, Break the Chain Campaign, IPS, and author, The Pigment of Your Imagination
Professor Clarence Lusane, author/activist and professor at American University.
Moderator: Saif Rahman, Movements Coordinator, IPS

THURSDAY, November 6, 12:30 – 2pm
Post-Election Analysis
Steve Cobble, Senior Scholar, IPS
John Cavanagh, Director, IPS
Bill Fletcher, labor and international activist
Moderator: Karen Dolan, Fellow, IPS

TUESDAY, November 11, 12:30 – 2pm
The Election and Climate Action: How climate change was discussed during the campaign.
Janet Redman, Researcher, Sustainable Energy and Economy Network, IPS
Brent Blackwelder, President, Friends of the Earth US
James Barrett, Executive Director, Redefining Progress
Arjun Makhijani, President, Institute for Energy and Environmental Research
Sandra Schubert,* Director, Government Affairs, Environmental Working Group
Moderator: Daphne Wysham, Fellow, IPS

For more than four decades, the Institute for Policy Studies has transformed ideas into action for peace, justice, and the environment. It is a progressive multi-issue think tank.
http://www.ips-dc.org.

IPS Mandate for Change Election Series: War and Peace

This election season, please join the Institute for Policy Studies in our series of provocative brown-bag luncheon discussions of the various issues in the platforms of the Democratic, Republican, Green, and Independent presidential candidates. IPS and Chester Hartman have a new book coming out at the culmination of this brown-bag series, Mandate for Change, which will put forth what we feel are the best and most creative policy solutions for these and other pressing local, national and international issues.

Phyllis Bennis, Fellow, New Internationalism project, IPS
Selig Harrison, Senior Fellow, Center for International Policy
William D. Hartung, Director, Arms and Security Initiative, New America Foundation

Moderator: John Feffer, Co-Director, Foreign Policy In Focus, IPS

Please RSVP to Adwoa Masozi at adwoa@ips-dc.org.

Issues of war and peace are at the center of the presidential race. Barack Obama opposed the invasion of Iraq while John McCain was one of the major supporters of the surge, and their positions on the withdrawal of U.S. troops remain far apart. Looking beyond Iraq, the candidates have taken different positions on U.S. policy toward Iran, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. They have disagreed with one another on face-to-face diplomacy with U.S. adversaries. Will the upcoming elections represent a watershed for U.S. engagement with the world, signaling a return to diplomacy and support for multilateralism? Or has a new bipartisan consensus emerged around high military spending, maintenance of 700-plus military bases worldwide, and continued intervention in countries like Afghanistan and Pakistan? Phyllis Bennis of the Institute for Policy Studies, Selig Harrison of the Center for International Policy, and William Hartung of the New America Foundation will explore these questions and more.

IPS fellow Phyllis Bennis is also a fellow of the Transnational Institute in Amsterdam. She has been a writer, analyst and activist on Middle East and UN issues for many years, primarily on opposing the Israeli occupation of Palestine and the U.S. occupation of Iraq, along with work on Iran, Afghanistan and more. In 1999 Phyllis accompanied a group of congressional aides to Iraq to examine the impact of U.S.-led economic sanctions on humanitarian conditions there, and later joined former UN Assistant Secretary General Denis Halliday, who resigned his position as Humanitarian Coordinator in Iraq to protest the impact of sanctions, in a speaking tour. In 2001 she helped found and currently serves on the steering committee of the U.S. Campaign to End Israeli Occupation. She works closely with the United for Peace and Justice anti-war coalition, and since 2002 has played an active role in the growing global peace movement. Her books include the just-published Understanding the US-Iran Crisis: A Primer and the forthcoming Ending the Iraq War: A Primer as well as Challenging Empire: How People, Governments and the UN Defy U.S. Power and other titles.

Selig S. Harrison is director of the Asia Program and the Iran Program at the Center for International Policy and a senior scholar of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. He has specialized in South Asia and East Asia for fifty years as a journalist and scholar and is the author of five books on Asian affairs and U.S. relations with Asia, including Korean Endgame: A Strategy For Reunification and U.S. Disengagement, published by Princeton University Press in May 2002. Harrison served as South Asia Correspondent of the Associated Press from 1951 to 1954, in New Delhi, returned as South Asia Bureau Chief of The Washington Post from 1962 to 1965, and served as Northeast Asia Bureau Chief of the Post, based in Tokyo, from 1968 to 1972. From 1974 to 1996, as a senior associate of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, he pursued investigative assignments every year in a variety of countries, especially those where he worked as a journalist, such as India, Pakistan, China, Japan, and the two Koreas. He covered Iran for The Washington Post in 1964 and 1965, did research there for the Carnegie Endowment in 1977 and 1978, and revisited Teheran in June, 2007 and February and June, 2008. His articles on Iran have appeared in Le Monde Diplomatique, The Washington Post, The Financial Times, Newsweek International and the International Herald Tribune.

William D. Hartung is director of the Arms and Security Initiative at the New America Foundation. The project serves as a resource for journalists, policymakers, and citizen’s organizations on the issues of weapons proliferation, the economics of military spending, and alternative approaches to national security strategy. Before coming to New America, Mr. Hartung worked for 15 years as director of the Arms Trade Resource Center at the World Policy Institute at the New School in New York City. He was also a policy analyst and speech writer for New York State Attorney General Robert Abrams, and a project director at the New York-based Council on Economic Priorities. An expert on weapons proliferation, the politics and economics of military spending, regional security, and national security strategy, Mr. Hartung is the author of numerous books, reports, and chapters in collected works on the issues of nuclear weapons, conventional arms sales, and the economics of military spending. He has served as a featured expert on the major network and cable news outlets, and has written for national and international newspapers and magazines on a variety of national security issues. His most recent book is Lessons from Iraq: Avoiding the Next War, co-edited with Miriam Pemberton and released by Paradigm Press in May 2008.

IPS Mandate for Change Election Series: The Economics of Inequality

This election season, please join the Institute for Policy Studies in our series of provocative brown-bag luncheon discussions of the various issues in the platforms of the Democratic, Republican, Green, and Independent presidential candidates. IPS and Chester Hartman have a new book coming out at the culmination of this brown-bag series, Mandate for Change, which will put forth what we feel are the best and most creative policy solutions for these and other pressing local, national and international issues.

Barbara Ehrenreich, IPS Senior Scholar and New York Times Bestselling Author 
Dean Baker, Co-Director, Center for Economic Policy Research 
Jared Bernstein, Director, Economic Policy Institute Living Standards Program

Moderator: Chuck Collins, Director, Inequality and the Common Good project, IPS
 

Please RSVP to Adwoa Masozi at adwoa@ips-dc.org.

Round-The-Clock Voting

Voting can no longer be a civic duty exercised every few years. We must now vote 365 days a year, telling our leaders that they won’t wait another election cycle to sink the country further into the Iraq War’s quagmire.

Dealing with Ortega

In what seems like a case of Cold War blues, U.S. officials had unsuccessfully attempted to sway the elections in favor of Mr. Ortega’s opponents. The meddling backfired, however.