Film: A Path Appears

Film: A Path Appears

An IPS and Community Cinema [DC] preview in a series uncovers the roots behind the incredible adversity faced every day by millions of women, while also presenting glimpses of hope and change.

Pot is Passed in DC: What Now?

Pot is Passed in DC: What Now?

As DC residents voted overwhelmingly for marijuana legalization, this panel, moderated by Sanho Tree of IPS’ Drug Policy Project, will discuss next steps for D.C.’s marijuana legalization initiative.

Brown Bag: We Are Family In DC

Brown Bag: We Are Family In DC

As gentrification and economic development rapidly change neighborhoods across the District of Columbia, thousands of low income households are being pushed to the margins.  Through a radical vision of community service and an extensive volunteer network, “We Are Family” brings groceries and provides basic assistance to 600 low income seniors in Columbia Heights and the North Capitol area each month.  Please join its co-director, Mark Anderson, and American University Professor of Sociology Michael Bader, for a discussion about the innovative methods used by scholars to study urban poverty – and the creative activism by community organizations addressing it.

Let’s Give Kids Better Mental Health

Let’s Give Kids Better Mental Health

In the District of Columbia, youth face particular challenges as disparities in resources and risks vary drastically in just a matter of miles.

Film: Crossing the American Crises: From Collapse to Action

Film: Crossing the American Crises: From Collapse to Action

From the makers of Beyond Elections, this new feature-length documentary takes us across the country amidst the economic collapse, to the grassroots solutions in the hands of the people.

On September 15, 2008, the United States fell into the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression. The same day filmmakers Sílvia Leindecker and Michael Fox set out on a trip around the country to ask the “American” people what they had to say about it.

Race and Economics: A Nation and Its Capital Divided

The best hope I see for the country and it’s cities, like Washington DC, is that sooner rather than latter the electorate recognizes that changing politicians isn’t a change we can believe in, rather the country must radically change the trickle down, deregulated economy which has maintained racial divisions and increased economic inequality.