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  • Released September 29, 2008

Reaction to Bailout Vote
By Sarah Anderson, Chuck Collins, Dedrick Muhammad, Sam Pizzigati

In response to the stunning House of Representatives vote against the proposed $700 billion bailout of Wall Street, IPS economic analysts propose ways to make Wall Street pay for the bailout, rather than average taxpayers.


  • Released September 22, 2008

Executive Summary for 'A Unified Security Budget for the United States'
By Miriam Pemberton

At a hearing before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in July, Eric Edelman, Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, said: “We all agree that a militarized foreign policy is not in our interests.” He’s right. Since 2004, the annual Unified Security Budget report has outlined and promoted a rebalancing of resources funding offense (military forces), defense (homeland security), and prevention (non-military international engagement, including diplomacy, nonproliferation, foreign aid, peacekeeping, and contributions to international organizations.)


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  • Released September 22, 2008

A Unified Security Budget for the United States, FY 2009
By Lawrence Korb and Miriam Pemberton

In this fifth annual edition of the “Unified Security Budget,” as with the previous four editions, a non-partisan task force of military, homeland security, and foreign policy experts laid out the facts of the imbalance between military and non-military spending. The ratio of funding for military forces vs. non-military international engagement in the Bush administration’s proposed budget for the 2009 fiscal year has widened to 18:1 from 16:1 in the 2008 fiscal year, according to the report.


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  • Released August 25, 2008

Executive Excess 2008: How Average Taxpayers Subsidize Runaway Pay
By Sarah Anderson, John Cavanagh, Chuck Collins, Mike Lapham, Sam Pizzigati

The U.S. tax code is riddled with loopholes that allow top corporate and financial leaders to avoid paying their fair share of taxes. Ordinary taxpayers wind up picking up the bill – to the tune of more than $20 billion per year. All five executive-friendly tax loopholes highlighted in the report are the targets of Congressional reforms. However, these efforts have stalled in the face of fierce opposition from corporate lobby groups. The report also finds that S&P 500 CEOs averaged $10.5 million in pay in 2007, 344 times the pay of typical American workers. Compensation levels for private investment fund managers soared even further. The top 50 hedge and private equity fund managers averaged $588 million each, more than 19,000 times as much as typical U.S. workers earned.


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  • Released June 24, 2008

High Flyers
By Sarah Anderson, Sam Bollier, John Cavanagh, Chuck Collins, Robert Weissman

As Americans prepare to pay extra for checked bags, wait in long lines, and endure increasingly crowded commercial flights, super-wealthy private jet owners are enjoying tax breaks and luxury at the public’s expense. “High Flyers: How Private Jet Travel Is Straining the System, Warming the Planet, and Costing You Money,” a report from the Institute for Policy Studies and Essential Action, exposes the impacts of private aviation on the air traffic system, carbon emissions, and everyday travelers. The report criticizes government inaction to rein in gas-guzzling, sky-crowding private jets, and the super-wealthy High Flyers who dodge security restrictions, carbon costs, and taxes.


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