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  • May 25, 2011

    UPI features report “Spent Nuclear Fuel Pools in the U.S.: Reducing the Deadly Risks of Storage”

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    "The largest concentrations of radioactivity on the planet will remain in storage at U.S. reactor sites for the indefinite future," senior institute researcher Robert Alvarez, the author of the report, wrote. "In protecting America from nuclear catastrophe, safely securing the spent fuel by eliminating highly radioactive, crowded pools should be a public safety priority of the highest degree."

  • May 25, 2011

    The Huffington Post features report “Spent Nuclear Fuel Pools in the U.S.: Reducing the Deadly Risks of Storage”

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  • May 25, 2011

    The Charlotte Observer features report “Spent Nuclear Fuel Pools in the U.S.: Reducing the Deadly Risks of Storage”

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    "The largest concentration of radioactivity on the planet will remain in storage at U.S. reactor sites for the indefinite future," Alvarez said. "These pools are not accident-free."

  • May 25, 2011

    Reuters features report “Spent Nuclear Fuel Pools in the U.S.: Reducing the Deadly Risks of Storage”

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    "We have to stop deluding ourselves into thinking jamming too much spent fuel into pools is a wise idea," Alvarez said on a call with reporters.

    "It may save money, but it may not be a wise think to do if something serious goes wrong as we have seen at Fukushima," said Alvarez.

  • May 24, 2011

    International Business Times features report “Spent Nuclear Fuel Pools in the U.S.: Reducing the Deadly Risks of Storage”

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    The report, authored by Robert Alvarez, who served as a Senior Policy Advisor to the Secretary of Energy during the Clinton administration, says the problem is that too often the spent fuel pools are storing more fuel -- and more highly radioactive fuel -- than they were designed for.

    Alvarez also says there have been at least 10 incidents in the last decade in which the spent fuel pool lost a significant amount of water, and there are other cases in which the systems that keep the pools functioning as they should are under strain. Much of this, he says, is simply because most of the pools in the country are at capacity already.

  • May 24, 2011

    The New York Times features report “Spent Nuclear Fuel Pools in the U.S.: Reducing the Deadly Risks of Storage”

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    “The largest concentrations of radioactivity on the planet will remain in storage at U.S. reactor sites for the indefinite future,” the report’s author, a senior scholar at the institute, wrote. “In protecting America from nuclear catastrophe, safely securing the spent fuel by eliminating highly radioactive, crowded pools should be a public safety priority of the highest degree.”

  • May 20, 2011

    Salem News

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    A new report entitled “Spent Nuclear Fuel Pools in the U.S.: Reducing the Deadly Risks of Storage,” to be released Tuesday by the Institute for Policy Studies (IPS), with support from the Project on Government Oversight, indicates the nature and extent of radioactive contamination and nuclear chain reactions due to the unsafe storage of nuclear fuel.


    At a news conference call at 1:30 p.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 24, report author Robert Alvarez will discuss these risks. An interactive map created by Physicians for Social Responsibility, with new data from the IPS report, makes it easy to determine the threat of nuclear catastrophe for specific U.S. regions.

  • May 10, 2011

    Marketplace

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    Robert Alvarez is with the Institute for Policy Studies.

    Robert Alvarez: This pretty much marks the end of Japan's romance with the atom.

    They had been lovers. Thirty percent of Japan's energy comes from nuclear, and was on its way to 50. Now, Alvarez thinks even the old plants:

    Alvarez: Will be eventually closed and Japan will move on to other energy sources.

  • May 2, 2011

    Oye! Times features report “Analyzing the Department of Energy's FY 2012 Budget ”

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    Now let's look at a report by the Institute for Policy Studies (IPS) that analyzed the Department of Energy's Fiscal Year 2012 Budget Request.  The IPS states that the DOE will spend, in total, 10 times more on military nuclear activities including the NNSA's nuclear weapons, non-proliferation activities, naval reactors (think submarines) and nuclear site cleanup than it does on energy conservation.  Here's the summary page from their report:
     
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    IPS states that a total of 46 percent of DOE's total budget is spent on military nuclear activities even though the DOE has not made a new nuclear weapon in the past 20 years.  Even though the American nuclear arsenal is half the size that it was during the height of the cold war, the spending on nuclear weapons has increased by more than 30 percent over the past 20 years, excluding the $100 billion that the Department of Defense plans to spend for bombers, submarines and missiles that will deploy nuclear weapons.  In 2010, America's nuclear arsenal consisted of 2500 tactical and strategic warheads, 2500 non-deployed warheads and 3500 retired warheads.  Between fiscal 2003 and 2016, nearly $15 billion will be spent to extend the life of existing warheads at a cost of between $11 and $12 million each.

  • May 2, 2011

    The Canadian

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    “I’ve been studying overhead photographs of Fukushima. It is very disturbing,” said Robert Alvarez, formerly a senior policy adviser at the Energy Department under Clinton. “The steel wall of the pool seems to show damage. All the surrounding equipment, including the two cranes, has been destroyed. There is smoke coming from reactor No. 3, and steam coming from the spent-fuel pool next to it. That indicates that the water in the pool is boiling.

    “And that means the spent-fuel rods are getting hot and could start burning. If the rods start to burn, huge amounts of radioactive material would be released into the atmosphere and would disperse across the northern hemisphere. Unlike the reactors, spent-fuel pools are not?I repeat not?housed in any sort of hardened or sealed containment structures. Rather, the fuel rods are packed tightly together in pools of water that are often several stories above ground…” continued Alvarez.

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