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  • May 26, 2011

    vtdigger.com features report “Spent Nuclear Fuel Pools in the U.S.: Reducing the Deadly Risks of Storage”

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    Alvarez wrote:

    As in Japan, all spent fuel pools at nuclear power plants do not have steel-lined, concrete barriers that cover reactor vessels to prevent the escape of radioactivity. They are not required to have back-up generators to keep used fuel rods cool, if offsite power is lost. The 69 Pressurized Water (PWR) reactors operating in the U.S. do not have elevated pools, and also lack proper containment, and several have large cavities beneath them which could exacerbate leakage.

  • May 26, 2011

    OpEdNews.com features report “Spent Nuclear Fuel Pools in the U.S.: Reducing the Deadly Risks of Storage”

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  • May 26, 2011

    Progressive Radio Network

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    “Unprotected and crowded spent nuclear fuel pools pose an unacceptable threat to the public,” said report author Robert Alvarez, senior scholar for nuclear policy at the Institute for Policy Studies. “Dry cask storage is a much safer alternative to pools. Some people say they are too expensive, but considering the extreme risks, the cost of doing nothing is incalculable.”

  • May 25, 2011

    The Christian Science Monitor features report “Spent Nuclear Fuel Pools in the U.S.: Reducing the Deadly Risks of Storage”

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    “Unprotected and crowded spent nuclear fuel pools pose an unacceptable threat to the public,” said Robert Alvarez, a senior scholar for nuclear policy at the nonpartisan Institute for Policy Studies (IPS), as well as a former Department of Energy official in the Clinton Administration, in a statement.

    “Dry cask storage is a much safer alternative to pools. Some people say they are too expensive, but considering the extreme risks, the cost of doing nothing is incalculable,” he added.

  • May 25, 2011

    UPI features report “Spent Nuclear Fuel Pools in the U.S.: Reducing the Deadly Risks of Storage”

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    "The largest concentrations of radioactivity on the planet will remain in storage at U.S. reactor sites for the indefinite future," senior institute researcher Robert Alvarez, the author of the report, wrote. "In protecting America from nuclear catastrophe, safely securing the spent fuel by eliminating highly radioactive, crowded pools should be a public safety priority of the highest degree."

  • May 25, 2011

    The Huffington Post features report “Spent Nuclear Fuel Pools in the U.S.: Reducing the Deadly Risks of Storage”

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  • May 25, 2011

    The Charlotte Observer features report “Spent Nuclear Fuel Pools in the U.S.: Reducing the Deadly Risks of Storage”

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    "The largest concentration of radioactivity on the planet will remain in storage at U.S. reactor sites for the indefinite future," Alvarez said. "These pools are not accident-free."

  • May 25, 2011

    Reuters features report “Spent Nuclear Fuel Pools in the U.S.: Reducing the Deadly Risks of Storage”

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    "We have to stop deluding ourselves into thinking jamming too much spent fuel into pools is a wise idea," Alvarez said on a call with reporters.

    "It may save money, but it may not be a wise think to do if something serious goes wrong as we have seen at Fukushima," said Alvarez.

  • May 24, 2011

    International Business Times features report “Spent Nuclear Fuel Pools in the U.S.: Reducing the Deadly Risks of Storage”

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    The report, authored by Robert Alvarez, who served as a Senior Policy Advisor to the Secretary of Energy during the Clinton administration, says the problem is that too often the spent fuel pools are storing more fuel -- and more highly radioactive fuel -- than they were designed for.

    Alvarez also says there have been at least 10 incidents in the last decade in which the spent fuel pool lost a significant amount of water, and there are other cases in which the systems that keep the pools functioning as they should are under strain. Much of this, he says, is simply because most of the pools in the country are at capacity already.

  • May 24, 2011

    The New York Times features report “Spent Nuclear Fuel Pools in the U.S.: Reducing the Deadly Risks of Storage”

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    “The largest concentrations of radioactivity on the planet will remain in storage at U.S. reactor sites for the indefinite future,” the report’s author, a senior scholar at the institute, wrote. “In protecting America from nuclear catastrophe, safely securing the spent fuel by eliminating highly radioactive, crowded pools should be a public safety priority of the highest degree.”

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