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Institute for Policy Studies
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  • March 11, 2011

    Bloomberg

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    “'The worst thing that could happen is that the core gets exposed and starts to melt,' said Robert Alvarez, a senior scholar at the Institute for Policy Studies in Washington, formerly a senior policy adviser at the U.S. Department of Energy under President Bill Clinton and a U.S. Senate staff expert on nuclear weapons.

    "Exactly what might happen is unknown, because no GE boiling water reactor has ever melted down, he said.

    “'It’s not this stuff turning into gloop and burning a hole down into the earth,'” Alvarez said. 'You have a lot of other stuff going on such as fires and possible explosions that could breach the containment.'”

  • March 11, 2011

    The Register Citizen (Torrington, CT) features article “The Government's Nuclear Millstone”

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  • March 10, 2011

    National Security Watch features article “The Government's Nuclear Millstone”

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  • February 11, 2011

    The Asia Times features blog “Food, Egypt, and Wall Street”

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    "Institute for Policy Studies senior scholar Robert Alvarez notes what hedge fund manager Michael McMasters told a U.S. Senate panel in 2008; this amounts to 'a form of electronic hoarding and greatly increases the inflationary effect of the market. It literally means starvation for millions of the world's poor.'"

  • February 8, 2011

    The Wall Street Journal's Blog features blog “Food, Egypt, and Wall Street”

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  • December 1, 2010

    Government Executive

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    "Last summer, a former Energy Department executive conducted an independent analysis of plutonium waste at five former U.S. nuclear weapons production facilities and reached a startling conclusion: During the past 45 years, about 12.7 metric tons of plutonium were discarded at the sites, more than three times the department's last official estimate, which was in 1996. The findings suggest Energy faces a far bigger job in cleaning up the radioactive waste generated through decades of nuclear weapons production than previously believed.

    "The dramatic increase, wrote Robert Alvarez, senior scholar at the Institute for Policy Studies, which published the findings in July, is likely due to three factors: the reclassification of some production residue as waste, previous underestimates of material lost through the production process, and improvements in the way data is characterized."

  • November 23, 2010

    New Scientist

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    "Although North Korea is believed to already possess plutonium-based nuclear weapons, uranium-based weapons can be more efficient, allowing them to produce more powerful explosions, says Robert Alvarez of the Institute for Policy Studies in Washington DC.

    "Uranium can also be used to trigger nuclear fusion of heavy isotopes of hydrogen, unleashing vastly more explosive power than is possible with uranium or plutonium alone, Alvarez says. But he adds that to make fusion weapons, North Korea would first have to develop other capabilities, including the ability to make the hydrogen isotope tritium."

  • November 20, 2010

    The New York Times

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    In seeking Senate support for the so-called New Start treaty with Russia, the White House agreed to spend $85 billion over the next decade upgrading the nuclear weapons system, only to find itself stymied by resistance from unsatisfied Republicans.

    The deal-making puts President Obama in the paradoxical position of investing vast sums in nuclear weapons even as he promises to put the world on a path to eliminating them.

    Even if the project goes forward with that much money, that may not be the end of it. Experts in nuclear weapons agree that the job of building a set of giant factories that can make warheads for the nation’s arsenal would take at least 20 years and countless more billions than are currently budgeted.

    “These individual projects have a long history of taking longer and costing more than the original estimates,” said Robert Alvarez, who from 1993 to 1999 was a policy adviser to the secretary of energy, who runs the nation’s nuclear complex.

  • November 19, 2010

    The Huffington Post features article “Kyl's Nuclear Non-Starter”

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  • November 19, 2010

    Counterpunch features article “Kyl's Nuclear Non-Starter”

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