Carlos Espinoza-Toro is an Associate Fellow with Program on Inequality and the Common Good, based at the Boston office of the Institute for Policy Studies.  He is an urban planner, architect, and consultant with over 10 years of experience providing high-quality bilingual technical assistance to small business owners, start-ups, research partnerships and nonprofits. He is the Small Business Program Director of the Jamaica Plain Neighborhood Development Corporation, which Brewery Small Business Complex is a national model for adaptive re-use of historic industrial buildings.

In 2012 Carlos founded CJET Consulting to assist organizations and individuals in idea development, reorganization, and experimentation. As a consultant, Carlos leads pilot projects, and conducts interactive strategic thinking and troubleshooting workshops. Utilizing a unique approach that uncovers the full potential of complex ideas, concepts and process and delivers tangible insight into synergy development among individuals and organizations.

Before becoming an IPS Associate Fellow, Carlos worked as the Director of Community Organizing of the Jamaica Plain New Economy Transition. He provided critical support to the implementation of transition initiatives through engaging with diverse groups, building trust, and addressing the tensions between systemic thinking and on-the-ground development.

Carlos holds a Masters in City Planning from the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Latest

Woman walking in front of Jamaica Plain graffiti

"Affordable?" For Whom?

As rent prices soar in Boston's Jamaica Plain neighborhood, JPNet's State of Our Neighborhood forum helps to give community residents and merchants a voice.

Associate Fellow

Institute for Policy Studies

Program on Inequality and the Common Good

carlos@ips-dc.org

Topics of Interest

Local Economy, New Economy, Sustainability

In the News

JP Auto Shop Goes Green

Jamaica Plain Gazette | June 5, 2015

Can Jamaica Plain businesses go carcinogen free?

The Boston Globe | October 31, 2014