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Institute for Policy Studies
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  • January 1, 2013

    USA Today features article “The fiscal cliff ... of '32”

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  • December 13, 2012

    Unionosity features article “In Fact, Fairly Taxing the Rich Won't Scare Them Away”

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  • December 12, 2012

    The Albany Tribune features article “In Fact, Fairly Taxing the Rich Won't Scare Them Away”

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  • December 7, 2012

    The (Prestonsburg, KY) Floyd County Times features article “For Pete's Sake, What's Happened to Our Democracy?”

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  • December 7, 2012

    Counterpunch features article “For Pete's Sake, What's Happened to Our Democracy?”

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  • December 3, 2012

    Nation of Change features article “To Move Forward, We Must Learn from Our Progressive Past”

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  • November 30, 2012

    The (Russellville, KY) News-Democrat & Leader features article “To Move Forward, We Must Learn from Our Progressive Past”

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  • November 14, 2012

    National Catholic Reporter features report “Executive Excess 2012: The CEO Hands in Uncle Sam's Pocket”

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    The Institute for Policy Studies’ “Executive Excess 2012” reports that in 2010 and 2011 a quarter of America’s 100 highest-paid CEOs took home more in pay than their corporations paid the U.S. in taxes. Two of those firms were Citigroup and AIG, both bailed out by taxpayers. In total, these 25 corporations have 533 subsidiaries in tax havens such as the Cayman Islands, Bermuda and Gibraltar.

    The CEOs’ hands in Uncle Sam’s pocket -- to use the institute’s neat phrase -- mean that “the four most direct tax subsidies for excessive executive pay cost taxpayers $14.4 billion per year -- $46 for every man, woman and child,” who, in effect, buy a CEO lunch, with a glass of wine, once a year.

  • November 13, 2012

    The Sidney (MT) Herald features report “Inequality Report Card: Grading Congress on Inequality”

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    We awarded “A+” grades to the 12 House members who did the most to narrow America’s economic divide over the past two years. Eleven of these lawmakers won.

    Three of the five senators who nailed top marks for their legislative actions to reduce inequality in America were up for re-election. They all won: Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I.

    Of the 45 [one-percent-friendly representatives] who were up for re-election, two lost. One was Rep. Nan Hayworth, R-N.Y., who was the lead sponsor of a bill to repeal a provision in the Dodd-Frank financial reform law that requires corporations to disclose the ratio between what they pay their CEO and their workers.

    This new metric could encourage a narrowing of the staggering inequality gaps within companies. In the midst of Hayworth’s two-year crusade against that provision, the SEC has failed to implement it.

  • November 9, 2012

    Unionosity features article “The Invisible Hand Won't Stop Inequality in Its Tracks”

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