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Institute for Policy Studies
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  • November 28, 2012

    The Nation features report “A Pension Deficit Disorder: The Massive CEO Retirement Funds and Underfunded Worker Pensions at Firms Pushing Social Security Cuts”

    Visit the publisher's websiteSee the report

    That’s not exactly “shared sacrifice.” A report from the Institute for Policy Studies notes that the 63 CEOs behind “Fix the Debt” would reap $134 billion in tax windfalls for their companies just from a territorial tax system alone.

  • November 28, 2012

    New Jersey Newsroom features report “The CEO Campaign to ‘Fix’ the Debt: A Trojan Horse for Massive Corporate Tax Breaks”

    Visit the publisher's websiteSee the report

    [A]ccording to the Institute for Policy Studies, their ideas of change also include massive tax breaks for themselves and their corporations. They are lobbying for a “territorial tax system” which means that they would not have to pay federal taxes on any money they earned overseas and brought back into the U.S. This would amount to $134 billion bonus for these companies.

  • November 28, 2012

    New Jersey Newsroom

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    The CEO Fiscal Leadership Council is made up of 63 companies, including heavy weights such as GE, Boeing, Honeywell and Goldman Sachs. In particular, they advocate changes that would “reform the tax code and cut low-priority spending,” and "keep debt under control over the long-term by focusing on the long-term growth of entitlement programs."

    However, according to the Institute for Policy Studies, their ideas of change also include massive tax breaks for themselves and their corporations. . . .

    The companies want the government to cut spending – but here the message is decidedly mixed. While advocating cuts in entitlement spending, Boeing has paid its lobbyists $12 million since last January to fight proposed cuts to defense and aerospace spending.

  • November 28, 2012

    The Nation features report “The CEO Campaign to ‘Fix’ the Debt: A Trojan Horse for Massive Corporate Tax Breaks”

    Visit the publisher's websiteSee the report

    That’s not exactly “shared sacrifice.” A report from the Institute for Policy Studies notes that the 63 CEOs behind “Fix the Debt” would reap $134 billion in tax windfalls for their companies just from a territorial tax system alone. That naturally would increase, not decrease, the deficit, so somebody’s got to pay—hence the Very Serious pleas to “reform” Medicare and Social Security.

    “These CEOs paint a stark picture of hypocrisy,” said Scott Klinger, co-author of that IPS report, in a statement. “They’re simply taking advantage of the so-called ‘fiscal cliff’ to push the same old agenda of more corporate tax breaks while shifting costs onto the poor and elderly.”

  • November 28, 2012

    The Washington Post features report “A Pension Deficit Disorder: The Massive CEO Retirement Funds and Underfunded Worker Pensions at Firms Pushing Social Security Cuts”

    Visit the publisher's websiteSee the report

    "Liberal and conservative groups alike are circulating reports that allege that the chief executives who comprise Fix the Debt run companies that have been promoting a “rash of corporate tax breaks” in the name of pro-growth tax reform. Beyond that, the group’s CEO members have been criticized by the left-leaning Institute for Policy Studies for seeking cuts in Social Security and Medicare for elderly Americans 'while sitting on an average of $9 million each in retirement funds.'"

  • November 28, 2012

    CNN features report “The CEO Campaign to ‘Fix’ the Debt: A Trojan Horse for Massive Corporate Tax Breaks”

    Visit the publisher's websiteSee the report

    "The Institute for Policy Studies, a longtime critic of CEO pay and economic inequality, has since put out two publications impugning the motives of those on the council.

    'These CEOs paint a stark picture of hypocrisy,' said Scott Klinger, a co-author of one of the reports said in a statement. 'They're simply taking advantage of the so-called 'fiscal cliff' to push the same old agenda of more corporate tax breaks while shifting costs onto the poor and elderly.'"

  • November 28, 2012

    CNN Money features report “A Pension Deficit Disorder: The Massive CEO Retirement Funds and Underfunded Worker Pensions at Firms Pushing Social Security Cuts”

    Visit the publisher's websiteSee the report

    But the most high-profile part of the campaign -- and the one that has been sharply criticized by the left -- is its CEO fiscal leadership council, which includes some of the biggest names in corporate America.

    . . . The Institute for Policy Studies, a longtime critic of CEO pay and economic inequality, has since put out two publications impugning the motives of those on the council.

    "These CEOs paint a stark picture of hypocrisy," said Scott Klinger, a co-author of one of the reports said in a statement. "They're simply taking advantage of the so-called 'fiscal cliff' to push the same old agenda of more corporate tax breaks while shifting costs onto the poor and elderly."

  • November 27, 2012

    Think Progress features report “A Pension Deficit Disorder: The Massive CEO Retirement Funds and Underfunded Worker Pensions at Firms Pushing Social Security Cuts”

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    "These CEOs have little cause for concern if government retirement assistance is cut, as they have millions of dollars squirreled away in their personal retirement accounts."

  • November 27, 2012

    The Huffington Post features report “The CEO Campaign to ‘Fix’ the Debt: A Trojan Horse for Massive Corporate Tax Breaks”

    Visit the publisher's websiteSee the report

    As negotiations to avert the so-called fiscal cliff intensify, corporate lobbying groups are pushing key tax perks that benefit the wealthy. A coalition of financial institutions, fossil fuel companies, telecommunications firms and even the cigarette company Altria are teaming up to block a tax increase on dividends -- a policy that overwhelmingly aids the rich.

    The corporate coalition, known as The Alliance for Savings and Investment, is composed exclusively of corporations and lobbying groups.

    The Alliance for Savings and Investment, which declined to comment for this article, is just one of several corporate lobbying groups that are pushing to include tax perks for the wealthy and large corporations in any deal to avert the fiscal cliff. The Campaign to Fix the Debt has organized dozens of corporate CEOs to advocate for $134 billion in tax breaks for Fortune 500 companies as part of any deal to avert the fiscal cliff, according to an analysis by the Institute for Policy Studies, a liberal think tank.

  • November 27, 2012

    Mother Jones features report “A Pension Deficit Disorder: The Massive CEO Retirement Funds and Underfunded Worker Pensions at Firms Pushing Social Security Cuts”

    Visit the publisher's websiteSee the report
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