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  • October 3, 2012

    Huffington Post features report “Inequality Report Card: Grading Congress on Inequality”

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    Want to know how your reps on Capitol Hill rate on inequality? Check out a new Congressional Report Card for the 99 Percent issued by my organization, the Institute for Policy Studies.

  • October 3, 2012

    Madville Times features report “Inequality Report Card: Grading Congress on Inequality”

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    Washington-based progressive think tank Institute for Policy Studies has issued its 2012 Inequality Report Card, which scores members of Congress on their support for the 99% rather than the richest 1% of Americans.

  • October 3, 2012

    The New Haven Register features report “Inequality Report Card: Grading Congress on Inequality”

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    “Members of Congress have the capacity to make sure all Americans, not just a privileged few, share in the wealth that we all together create,” study co-author Scott Klinger, associate fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies said in a release. “With this new report card, voters can see for themselves how well their elected lawmakers are meeting that responsibility.”

  • October 3, 2012

    National Journal

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  • October 3, 2012

    National Journal features report “Inequality Report Card: Grading Congress on Inequality”

    Visit the publisher's websiteSee the report

    The liberal think tank Institute for Policy Studies is out today with a "Congressional Report Card for the 99%" that dings Republicans as the "most 1% friendly" lawmakers.

  • October 3, 2012

    The San Francisco Chronicle features report “Inequality Report Card: Grading Congress on Inequality”

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    "Advocacy groups have long rated members of Congress on their voting record as regards the environment, child welfare, conservative values, education, and a raft of other issues and philosophies. So it was only a matter of time before Americans would see a report card grading their leaders on how their votes widen or narrow the great divide between the wealthiest 1 percent and the rest of us," wrote the San Francisco Chronicle's editorial board on its Opinion Shop blog. "Today, the Institute for Policy Studies issued its report card on how the members of Congress are wielding their considerable power to shape our economy. That is, how they vote on tax rules, trade policies, subsidies and contracts. The topics, in fact, at the heart of tonight’s presidential debate between President Obama and his challenger, Republican Mitt Romney."

  • October 3, 2012

    The Huffington Post features report “Inequality Report Card: Grading Congress on Inequality”

    Visit the publisher's websiteSee the report

    When we started the grading process, we feared it could turn out to be a big bore. With Congress so polarized, we expected to find lock-step partisan voting that would give all Republicans F's and all Democrats A's. Instead, we found that the divisiveness between parties is also alive and well within parties.

    In general, however, we found Republicans to be extremely loyal to the "1 percent." We gave 59 of them an F. 

    The point of this report card is not just to name and shame. We also aim to draw attention to the many creative proposals for restoring fairness that deserve more support. Two of the pending bills on our list would raise revenue for human needs by putting a small tax on Wall Street transactions. Another would increase the minimum wage and then index it to inflation.

  • September 28, 2012

    Inter Press Service

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    “There’s a good chance there will be fresh thinking on FTT in the next administration,” Sarah Anderson, with the Institute for Policy Studies, a think tank here in Washington, told IPS. “Not only will there be new economic policy leaders coming in, but the international debate has changed dramatically since President Obama first took office.”

  • September 25, 2012

    The Nation

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    Victory won’t come easy. Sarah Anderson, who directs the Global Economy Project at the Institute for Policy Studies, notes that “Obama’s communications director was asked about this at a press event during the convention and didn’t get an enthusiastic response. So that was a disappointing moment.”

  • September 14, 2012

    Japan Times features report “Executive Excess 2012: The CEO Hands in Uncle Sam's Pocket”

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