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A few well-written words can convey a wealth of information, particularly when there is no lag time between when they are written and when they are read. The IPS blog gives you an opportunity to hear directly from IPS scholars and staff on ideas large and small and for us to hear back from you.

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Entries since September 2012

Page Previous 12 • 3
This Week in OtherWords: September 10-16, 2012

September 10, 2012 ·

This week, OtherWords is running a debut column by Katie Halper, our new guest columnist. Katie, a young writer who is also a stand-up comedian, has shared an “unedited” (that is, a painfully honest and entertaining) draft of Ann Romney’s speech with our readers.

Thanks to all the newspaper editors who are now running Sam Pizzigati’s column — this week he unpacks the shortcomings of the growing business of teaching K-12 public school kids online through for-profit enterprises. As always, I encourage you to subscribe to our weekly newsletter and visit our blog. If you haven't signed up yet, please do.

  1. A Glimmer of Military Budget Sanity / Miriam Pemberton and Gabriel I. Rossman
    Even House Republicans can't stomach spending $17,000 on a helicopter drip pan.
  2. Illegal Interns / Eric Glatt
    Unpaid internships have metastasized into a labor market scourge.
  3. We Won the War on Poverty, then Lost the Peace / Salvatore Babones
    If America could eliminate most serious poverty in the United States in the 1960s, surely we could do the same today.
  4. The Drought Lottery / Ryan Alexander
    Our lawmakers should spend the next month figuring out how to reduce our $16 trillion debt instead of showering special interests with even more wasteful subsidies that have nothing to do with the drought.
  5. Virtually, Anything Goes with Online Education / Sam Pizzigati
    State officials are allowing tax dollars to underwrite K-12 virtual disasters.
  6. Ann Romney's Unedited Convention Speech Leaked / Katie Halper
    Sometimes the elevator for our cars takes an inordinate amount of time.
  7. Radioactive Ties / Jim Hightower
    Whether corporate political money shouts or whispers, it still corrupts.
  8. Just Another Corporate Profit Center / William A. Collins
    Americans who want to know what caused Haiti's devastation need to look in the mirror.
  9. Military Pork Shield / Khalil Bendib (Cartoon)
Military Pork Shield, an OtherWords cartoon by Khalil Bendib
7 Ways to End the Deficit (without Throwing Grandma under the Bus)

September 5, 2012 ·

This post originally appeared on Yes! Magazine's New Economy blog.

This fall, the U.S. Congress is going to wage a pitched, dragged-out battle over cutting roughly $120 billion a year to solve the so-called deficit crisis. Vital things like teachers’ jobs and Medicare could well get cut.

The Right is already launching new coalitions to push for an austerity budget, calling for cuts in “wasteful government spending,” including key safety-net programs like Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, and food stamps. America has overspent, they say. America is broke. But at the same time, they are calling for an extension of the Bush tax cuts and ruling out cuts in military spending—both policies that will increase the deficit.

It doesn’t have to be this way. My colleagues at the  Institute for Policy Studies (IPS) have identified seven steps that, together, more than eliminate the deficit while making the country more equitable, green, and secure.

America is not brokeThese proposals, from the IPS study called “America is Not Broke,” would also address the two deficits that author David Korten says do more to erode our society than the fiscal deficit does: our social deficits (rising poverty and inequality) and environmental deficits (starting with the climate crisis).

More Fairness, Less Deficit

Our first three proposals could bring in $329 billion a year; this alone would solve the deficit problem while helping to close the yawning inequality gap.

  • 1.  Tax Wall Street: $150 billion per year. A tiny tax on stock and derivatives transactions, which several European countries are on track to adopt, would discourage Wall Street speculation, fill the hole in the deficit left by the Bush tax cuts, and leave plenty left over to fund lots of programs. The National Nurses Union and many other allies are fighting hard for this.
  • 2.  Tax Corporations and Stop Tax Haven Abuse: $100 billion per year. The Financial Accountability and Corporate Transparency coalition has pointed out that one of the main ways that corporations avoid paying taxes is by declaring their profits in overseas tax havens like the Cayman Islands.  
  • 3.  Tax the Wealthy Fairly: $79 billion per year. Our rigged tax code lets CEOs pay a lower tax rate than their secretaries do (as Warren Buffett keeps pointing out). The proposed Fairness in Taxation Act (HR 1124) would address this by adding five additional tax brackets for incomes over $1 million.

These three policy changes would go a long way toward making our society more equal, and that means better health, too. There is a terrific body of global evidence, a lot of it compiled by British researchers Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett, that more equal societies are much healthier. People at all income levels live longer; they are more fulfilled; and there is less violence. The United States, a relatively equal society as recently as the 1970s, is now off the charts in terms of wealth and income inequality. It doesn’t have to be that way. Just as we created a more just and vibrant economy and a strong middle class through fair taxes between 1940 and 1980, we can do it again through progressive taxation.   

More Green, Less Pollution

The second source of revenue would make the economy more green, a key imperative in a world where the environmental crisis is now as deep as the economic one. We found two simple ways to raise revenues and help save the environment.

  • 4.  Tax Pollution: $75 billion per year. A tax on the carbon content of fossil fuels would reduce our dependence on oil while cutting air pollution and emissions of greenhouse gases. And, as economist Robert Frank pointed out on August 25 in The New York Times, “News that a carbon tax was coming would create a stampede to develop energy-saving technologies.”
  • 5.   End Fossil Fuel Subsidies: $12 billion per year. This call should unite left and right. Why would anyone want to maintain a giant government subsidy to an industry that is the world’s major contributor to fossil-fuel emissions? 350.org has made this a centerpiece of their work. We should be able to win this.

More Savings, Less War

Finally, there are simple ways to cut the military while making the country and the world more secure. More than half of government discretionary spending now goes to the military. Congress has long avoided cuts, in part because they equate military spending with jobs, but IPS has pointed out that almost every other industry employs more workers per dollar than the military. Plus, there is now bipartisan support for two sets of significant cuts.

  • 6.  End Military Waste: $109 billion per year. A broad spectrum of experts has found over $100 billion a year in waste that could be eliminated with no sacrifice in security. Three recent commissions, two of them bi-partisan, have recommended roughly $1 trillion in military cuts over 10 years.
  • 7.  Close a third of our overseas bases and our Iraq operations: $21 billion per year. Over two decades after the Cold War ended, the United States still maintains roughly 1,000 military installations in other countries. A majority of the President’s own deficit commission, which includes three Republican senators—the National Commission on Financial Responsibility and Reform—backed a proposal to close one third of our overseas military bases.

These seven simple steps would raise close to $550 billion a year. They would quickly erase the fiscal deficit  and return the country to a healthy budget surplus. There would be hundreds of billions left to invest in key sectors that could make the country more secure, more green, and more equitable: care jobs, green jobs, infrastructure jobs.

In other words, this plan could help erase the nation’s dangerous social and environmental deficits.

Many groups—from Jobs with Justice to National People’s Action to the AFL-CIO—are organizing to counter a push by the Right to use the deficit crisis to shred social programs and our nation’s safety net. Let’s up the ante and spread the message. America is not broke. We have plenty of resources to rebuild shared prosperity in the U.S.

What Will Excluded Workers Celebrate Next Labor Day?

September 5, 2012 ·

While the Labor Day holiday is meant to give us time to reflect on the victories in human progress that were hard-fought by the Union movement, it is also a great time to check in on the "excluded workers" movement — workers who, because of policy or practice, fall outside the traditional labor protections offered to other workers in the US.

On August 29th, domestic workers all over the US celebrated the California Assembly's passage of AB889, the Domestic Workers Bill of Rights. A coalition of domestic workers, employers, and allies have come together in an unprecedented way to organize fellow Californians in support. Even actress and comedian Amy Poehler produced a PSA urging action. The bill is now awaiting signature by Governor Jerry Brown, and organizers are hopeful that he will act quickly, allowing California to become the second state to pass legislation that specifically addresses the needs of domestic workers who are largely excluded from protection under current labor laws.

Direct care workers in Florida are using their stories to fight their exclusion from the Fair Labor Standards Act. Photo by Direct Care Alliance.Meanwhile, direct care workers (those who provide vital in-home assistance to seniors and people with disabilities) are organizing for action from the Obama Administration to close the "companionship exemption" — which has kept direct care workers from receiving guaranteed minimum wage and overtime protections under the Fair Labor Standards Act since 1974. Earlier this year, the Department of Labor finally issued a proposed rule to close this loophole, and during the public comment period more than 26,000 Americans weighed on the regulation. The vast majority of them were in favor of extending basic protections to these workers.

With baby boomers turning 65 (one every eight seconds) and advances in medicine and public policy allowing people with disabilities to live in their homes and communities instead of institutions, the need for direct care workers and attendants is expected to grow. Yet because the job quality is so low (nearly half of direct care workers rely on public assistance to make ends meet), turnover is high and there may not be enough trained, dedicated workers to provide the kind of quality care that our families will need. Closing this loophole is one of the first steps we can take as a country to ensure that this workforce is ready for the change in demographics that has already begun. On September 21st, the Direct Care Alliance is putting together a day of action for direct care workers, you can learn more about it at www.directcarealliance.org.

Here in DC, after news broke that a group of students on J-1 "summer work travel" visas had been exploited at a Hershey Company packing plant in Pennsylvania, the National Guestworker Alliance successfully pushed for changes in the State Department-monitored visa program to reduce participants' vulnerability to abuse. Earlier this summer NGA joined forces with other worker and immigrant advocacy groups, including my project at the Institute for Policy Studies, to examine the full range of temporary work visa programs and recommend changes in policy that could help prevent human trafficking and exploitation. Another organization in this new coalition, the Global Worker Justice Alliance, released a report in May called Visas, Inc., which digs deeply into the world of foreign temporary work visas: in particular how unscrupulous corporations have found ways to exploit the regulatory weaknesses in these programs to undermine US workers' employment, and exploit foreign guestworkers for profit.

The traditional labor union movement brought enormous gains in working conditions for our country, and led the way for other civil rights breakthroughs throughout history, but it is important to remember how far we still have to go. Not only are these gains being threatened every day, there are still workers who remain excluded from even the most basic protections like minimum wage and health and safety regulations, and workers who are tricked into exploitative visa programs rigged by corporate interests. But there is hope: workers have earned many victories over the past century, and with more people joining us in organizing and advocacy for excluded workers, next Labor Day I am sure we will have even more to celebrate.

This Week in OtherWords: September 3-9, 2012

September 3, 2012 ·

This week, OtherWords addresses the dangers posed by the resounding lack of competition among the companies that control the smartphone market. Craig Aaron warns that AT&T is about to charge consumers more for less service and Sam Pizzigati explains that the windfalls extracted from Apple's patenting bonanza will pad its top executives' pockets. As always, I encourage you to subscribe to our weekly newsletter and visit our blog. If you haven't signed up yet, please do.
 
  1. The Six Stages of Climate Grief / Daphne Wysham
    I have discovered a new sixth stage, beyond acceptance of the truly depressing climate science: doing The Work.
  2. AT&T's Upside-Down World / Craig Aaron
    If we had actual competition for mobile phone services in America, AT&T's decision to charge you more for less would never fly.
  3. Indefensible: The Truth about Pentagon Spending / Suzie Dershowitz
    A mountain of misleading rhetoric from big Pentagon contractors has buried the facts.
  4. Losing Latino Votes / Raul A. Reyes
    The more we know about Ryan, the more obvious it becomes that he and Romney aren't a winning combination for America.
  5. Who's Really Winning the Smartphone Wars? / Sam Pizzigati
    We're letting top executives of giant corporations expropriate public "property" for private gain.
  6. The Koch Brothers' Moonshine / Jim Hightower
    The paper industry's titans have teamed up with practitioners of the legislative black arts to turn their sludge into a slick tax loophole.
  7. Sorry, You Can't Get There From Here / William A. Collins
    The United States has invested big time in roads, but not rails.
  8. Ryan at the Trough / Khalil Bendib (cartoon)
     Ryan at the Trough, an OtherWords cartoon by Khalil Bendib
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