John Feffer


John Feffer

John Feffer is director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies.

He is the author of several books and numerous articles. He has been a Writing Fellow at Provisions Library in Washington, DC and a PanTech fellow in Korean Studies at Stanford University. He is a former associate editor of World Policy Journal. He has worked as an international affairs representative in Eastern Europe and East Asia for the American Friends Service Committee. He has studied in England and Russia, lived in Poland and Japan, and traveled widely throughout Europe and Asia. He has taught a graduate level course on international conflict at Sungkonghoe University in Seoul in July 2001 and delivered lectures at a variety of academic institutions including New York University, Hofstra, Union College, Cornell University, and Sofia University (Tokyo).

John has been widely interviewed in print and on radio. He serves on the advisory committees of the Alliance of Scholars Concerned about Korea. He is a recipient of the Herbert W. Scoville fellowship and has been a writer in residence at Blue Mountain Center and the Wurlitzer Foundation.

His website is:


The Middle East’s New Nakba

The chain of events set into motion by the U.S. invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq is reaching its logical conclusion — the disintegration of multi-ethnic states and a great expulsion of innocents.

After Obama: Clinton vs. Sanders

Hillary Clinton just laid out a hawkish foreign policy vision in a major speech. How do her views stack up against those of Bernie Sanders, her challenger from the left?

China and the Opportunity Costs of September 11

The world's two major powers lost a decade that could have been spent hashing out responses to climate change, the arms trade, and the global recession.

North Korea’s Sorry Politics

South Korea should focus less on extracting apologies from North Korea and more on pursuing pragmatic projects with Pyongyang.

The Middle Passage

For the refugees pouring into Europe, their journeys can be just as deadly as the war zones they're fleeing.