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Institute for Policy Studies
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  • February 15, 2011

    The Huffington Post features article “Taxing Financial Speculation, Raising Funds for Critical Needs”

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  • January 24, 2011

    AlertNet

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    "The ingredients -- multiple polluters, remote forests, invisible gases, financial speculators and hard-to-verify carbon offsets -- make carbon trading a 'recipe for corruption,' agrees Daphne Wysham, a fellow at the Washington-based Institute for Policy Studies and founder of the Sustainable Energy and Economy Network.

    "'The system is ungovernable, from start to finish,' she says. 'We do not have the capacity to monitor every polluter and every timber thief and every derivatives trader in every part of the globe, and yet we are opening up markets to trading in invisible gases that will involve these.'"

  • January 5, 2011

    The (Worthington, MN) Daily Globe features article “Our Slow-Motion Global Accident”

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  • January 5, 2011

    The Vernon County Broadcaster features article “Our Slow-Motion Global Accident”

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  • January 4, 2011

    Independent

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    "Daphne Wysham, a fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies think tank, is part of a growing coalition that supports the idea of a carbon tax. With cap and trade legislation a dead duck in the new Republican-dominated House of Representatives, Wysham figures that campaigners in the US have two years to start educating the public about the benefits of "tax and rebate" before the political complexion of Congress shifts again. In the meantime she's bullish about the potential for US action. 'We may exceed the targets that the US has put on the table through a switch to natural gas from coal and a ramping up of wind energy; in addition, there's a major pushback from the grassroots against existing and proposed coal-fired electricity plants based on their mercury and other emissions.' But however the political climate changes, and despite the shifting sands of globalisation, (climate scientist James) Hansen will be using his expertise to try and avert a toxic timebomb for our descendants and their planet."

  • December 13, 2010

    Solve Climate News

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    "Daphne Wysham, a fellow at the Washington-based Institute for Policy Studies who studies energy issues, said in an interview that she understands the appeal of a carbon tax.

    “'We do have an interesting array of organizations from the left and the right saying a carbon tax is much better than cap and trade,' Wysham says. 'I think a payroll tax shift is one possible approach that could work. In this current economic climate, it may stimulate employers to hire more people. And if a dividend was being returned to people, it would be even more palatable.'”

  • December 10, 2010

    Common Dreams features article “Cancun: Can We Avert Climate Chaos?”

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  • December 10, 2010

    Voice of America

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    "Janet Redman from the Washington-based Institute for Policy Studies supports the coalition against REDD, saying that carbon markets will not improve local development.

    "'It doesn't deliver; it's not additional,' said Redman. 'It's been used for some incredibly harmful projects for communities who live in the local area. So to put the last remaining forests on the market seems to me an incredibly irresponsible thing to do.'"

  • December 4, 2010

    The Globe and Mail (Canada)

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    "Last April, Mr. Morales played host to the People's Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth, which issued a manifesto calling on rich countries to finance the 'decolonization of the atmosphere.' The Cochabamba Accord was endorsed by activist groups throughout the developed world.

    "'There is both a legal and a moral obligation to deal with climate debt,' says Janet Redman, a co-director of the [Sustainable Energy and Economy project at the] Institute for Policy Studies in Washington, who helped to draft the document. Among the speakers at Cochabamba was Canadian activist Naomi Klein, a vocal advocate of the need for reparations.

  • November 22, 2010

    Ecopolitology.org

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    "Recent loans for coal-fired power plants is evidence to the fact that the World Bank is still in the business of loaning money for massive construction projects with the most favorable cost-benefit ratio -- with benefits measured almost entirely in terms of economic benefits.

    "'[The World Bank] is constantly stalling on one very important policy: calculating the greenhouse-gas emissions produced by its own projects,' said Janet Redman , co-director of the Sustainable Energy and Economy Network at the Institute for Policy Studies. 'In its actions, the World Bank has deviated from its rhetoric,' Redman said."

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